Taking bedwetting medications with ease

The familiar song notwithstanding, sometimes a spoonful of sugar doesn't make the medicine go down. Taking medications, especially for a child, can be a tricky experience that is very difficult to swallow. This can make "medicine time" a stressful and overwhelming experience for some children and parents, and it may make treating your child's bedwetting more difficult. Although different children will react differently with difficulties in taking medication, the consequences are usually the same - the medication is not taken as directed, resulting in the child not receiving the full benefit of their medication.

Did you know that there may be more than one option for your child when it comes to taking medications? There are many different options available to help with your child's bedwetting, including overnight diapers, bedwetting alarms, behavioural techniques, and medications. Similar to migraine, cough, cold, and asthma medications, bedwetting medications are available in various dosage forms, including tablets and quick-dissolving tablets that melt in the mouth. Finding the right dosage and form can help your child take their medication more easily and as directed.

Your doctor can help you choose the right form of bedwetting medication based on your child's experiences. For example, you may want to ask yourself some questions before seeing your child's doctor, including the following:

  1. Does your child gag or throw-up when you give them oral medications to swallow?
  2. Does your child seem to have trouble swallowing oral medications, especially pills?
  3. Are there times when you don't have access to water?
  4. Do you want to limit the amount of liquids your child has before bedtime?

If your child has difficulty taking their bedwetting medications, you should talk to their doctor or pharmacist about what other options are available - whether they are on the medication for 3 days or 3 years.

Interested in trying a different option for your child?

Talk to your doctor about the difficulties that you and your child are experiencing with taking bedwetting medication. Other options are available, and your doctor can help you find a solution for your child.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Bedwetting-Finding-Solutions

Bedwetting research news

Bedwetting and breast-feeding

A recent study found that children who had been breast-fed might be less likely to wet the bed.

Researchers examined two groups of children: one group wet the bed, and the other did not. The first group was made up of children who visited doctor's offices and clinics for bedwetting treatment. The second group was taken from children who visited their doctor's office for reasons other than bedwetting.

The study found that 81.2% of the children who did not wet the bed were breast-fed longer than 3 months, compared with only 45.5% of those who did wet the bed. The researchers concluded that breast-feeding longer than 3 months may help protect children from wetting the bed. However, this link is still controversial, and further studies are needed to investigate whether breast-feeding really does protect from bedwetting.

Bedwetting and the brain

Canadian researchers based in Montreal have found links between bedwetting and developmental delays. In a national study of 1,666 children, researchers found that children who wet the bed were slower to reach certain milestones for language and motor skills (such as sitting up or crawling). Certain behaviour problems, such as hyperactivity, were also more common in children who wet the bed. So what's the link? Researchers believe that the bedwetting and the developmental problems may both be linked to the same problems within the brain. Future research may involve mapping out these problems to specific brain areas so that new treatments can be developed.

What can you do in the meantime? Speak to your doctor if you're concerned about your child's bedwetting or their overall development.

Keep up with the latest research!

Researchers are working to discover more about the causes and treatment of bedwetting. Don't miss the latest breakthroughs - talk to your doctor about your child's treatment options.

New treatment options are available that could dramatically help your child - talk to your doctor for more information.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Bedwetting-Finding-Solutions

Talking to your doctor about bedwetting

How your doctor can help

Have you ever wondered whether your child is getting the best treatment for bedwetting, or whether there was more you could do?

Your doctor can help you solve your family's bedwetting problems. Here are some of the things your doctor can do for you and your family:

  • help you and your child learn more about bedwetting
  • provide information about treatment options and ways to cope
  • recommend an option that's right for your child
  • help your child learn to use the treatment
  • keep you up to date on new research and treatment options as they become available

Time to talk to your child's doctor?

How do you know when it's time to talk to your child's doctor? Ask yourself:

  • Is bedwetting taking a toll on your family?
  • Is your family trying to cope without treatment, but finding it hard?
  • Do you feel that your child's treatment is not working as well as you would like?
  • Is your child's treatment inconvenient or disruptive for your family?
  • Is your child having side effects from the treatment?
  • Are you not sure if the treatment is being used properly?
  • Are you wondering if there are better ways to manage your child's bedwetting?

If you answered "Yes" to any of these questions, it may be time to talk to your doctor about your child's bedwetting treatment options.

10 questions to ask your child's doctor

Once you're in the doctor's office, what questions do you need to ask? Use this list to get you started, and jot down any other questions that your family may have:

  1. What treatment options are available to help with my child's bedwetting?
  2. Which treatment option(s) do you recommend, and why?
  3. How does the treatment work?
  4. What's the proper way to use the treatment?
  5. When will the treatment start to work?
  6. How long should my child continue treatment?
  7. Are there any side effects I should watch out for, and what should I do if they happen?
  8. What should we do if my child is planning an overnight trip away from home?
  9. What should we do if my child has trouble swallowing pills?
  10. Are there any other coping techniques that our family could try?
     
    Other: _________________________
     
    Other: _________________________

Your doctor will ask you a number of questions to investigate your child's bedwetting. Before your visit, make a note of:

  • your child's wetting patterns (i.e., how frequently they wet the bed, whether they also wet during the day)
  • whether anyone else in your family was a bedwetter
  • your child's medications and other health conditions
  • the appearance of your child's urine (e.g., cloudy, unusual colours), and whether they have pain when they urinate

If you feel uncomfortable bringing up the topic of bedwetting with your doctor, you're not alone! But it's well worth it. Your doctor can help make sure your child is receiving the best treatment for their bedwetting, and this can help your whole family.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Bedwetting-Finding-Solutions

Making changes: family stories

Is your family struggling with bedwetting? Take heart - a few simple changes may make all the difference. Find out how these everyday families took charge of their bedwetting problems.

Speaking up helps a family find solutions

Madison's* parents, Brian and Katherine, had read that bedwetting usually stopped around age 5 or 6. But at 7 years of age, Madison was still wetting the bed. Madison's parents were concerned, but they weren't sure how to bring it up with their doctor, or how to talk to their daughter about it. Talking about the problem embarrassed them, so they decided to "wait it out". This put a strain on their family and a crimp on Madison's social life.

It wasn't until they heard how a friend's son found a successful treatment for his bedwetting that Brian and Katherine decided to talk to their doctor. Taking this simple step made all the difference for Madison and her family. The doctor helped them learn more about bedwetting and find a treatment that worked for them. The doctor also helped them understand that bedwetting is something that affects many families. Now with successful treatment, Madison is feeling better about herself and enjoying a normal social life, and her parents are glad they took the step of talking to their doctor.

Finding the one that worked

Keith and Judy's* 9-year-old son, Ben, was having problems with his bedwetting treatment. Ben's doctor had recommended a medication that was specific for his bedwetting, but like many children, Ben had trouble swallowing the tablets. When the time came for his nightly dose, Ben would often gag on the pill and be unable to swallow it. This was upsetting for Keith and Judy, and also for Ben, who really wanted the pills to work so that he could go on an overnight camping trip with his friends and his dad.

Frustrated, Keith and Judy took Ben back to his doctor to see if there was anything he could recommend. Ben's doctor gave them a new prescription for a different form of the medication that melted instantly in the mouth, he thought might solve the problem. The family gave it a try, and Ben found it much easier to take. Thanks to this simple change, Ben was able to go on his camping trip, and the whole family found "medicine time" much easier.

Your family's story

Do these stories sound familiar? Is your family struggling with bedwetting? To make sure your family's story has a happy ending, follow the lead of the families above, and speak to your doctor about your child's treatment options.

 
*The family stories featured here are hypothetical stories based on the combined experience of families coping with bedwetting.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Bedwetting-Finding-Solutions