Skin infections?

Does my psoriasis make me more prone to skin infections? It may. Bacteria normally live on our skin, and research shows that the same types of bacteria found on healthy skin are also found on psoriasis lesions (although on lesions they appear in greater numbers). Normally, however, this does not cause infection. However, if an aggressive type of bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus is present, then the risk of developing a skin infection increases. If you think you may have an infection, consult your doctor.

Vigourous scratching resulting from itchy scaling can also increase the risk of infections. If you scratch too strongly, you risk injuring the skin which then opens the door to a bacterial infection. If you find you cannot avoid hard scratching, ask your doctor to suggest different options for itch relief.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Psoriasis-FAQ

Injury?

Can psoriasis develop around the site of an injury? Yes. If you have psoriasis, lesions have been known to occur on parts of skin that have been injured. This may include areas of scrapes and scratches, sunburns, or places where you've received a vaccination. This tendency for psoriasis to appear around injured areas of skin is called the Koebner phenomenon. Injuries don't act as a "trigger" for everyone who has psoriasis; nevertheless, this phenomenon presents another good reason why you should resist picking and scratching at psoriais lesions.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Psoriasis-FAQ

Hair loss?

I have scalp psoriasis. Does this mean I'll lose my hair? Psoriasis itself does not cause hair loss. However, severe psoriasis lesions on your scalp, as well as some treatments such as salicylic acid, may lead to temporary hair loss. Almost half of everyone who has psoriasis develops scalp psoriasis, and some of these people will experience thick, crusted plaques on their scalp. Hair can become entwined with these plaques, and as you attempt to remove these plaques, hair may go along with it. But because psoriasis does not cause hair loss, your hair will regrow.

If you have scalp psoriasis and you are concerned about your hair, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Psoriasis-FAQ

Genetic predisposition?

Do race or skin colour play a role in developing psoriasis? Race and skin colour do not play a direct role in whether or not a person is likely to develop psoriais. Psoriasis is linked to a disorder of the immune system, and skin colour does not affect the function of the immune system. Nevertheless, it is known that genetics are involved in the development of the condition, and so the likelihood of inheriting the responsible genes may differ among racial groups. For example, people of European descent are more likely than African-Americans or those of aboriginal origin in North or South America to develop psoriasis. Research continues into the reasons for these differences, but factors such as genetics and environmental triggers are believed to be involved.

Interestingly, experts have learned that a genetic predisposition does not ensure the later development of the condition. It appears an additional environmental trigger (such as stress or an infection) is needed for psoriasis to occur. Research is ongoing.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Psoriasis-FAQ

Swimming?

Will swimming in chlorinated or salt water worsen my condition? Swimming in chlorine or salt water will not necessarily aggravate your psoriasis. If you have psoriasis, it is a good idea to remain as active as you normally would, and you may find that swimming is a sport that suits your needs better than others, as it does not involve much sweating or physical contact (both of which may irritate sensitive skin). Keep in mind, though, that chlorine often has a drying effect on skin, so if you're swimming in a chlorinated pool, be sure to rinse the chlorine off as soon as you're out of the water and make sure that you apply a heavy cream or lotion afterwards to help trap moisture in your skin. If you find that the chlorine aggravates your skin, try swimming outdoors in a lake or in salt water when the weather allows. This may prove gentler on your skin. Some people find that swimming in salt water offers healing benefits to their psoriasis.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Psoriasis-FAQ

Cosmetic options?

Are cosmetic options available to hide my condition? Yes. Many people choose to use a cosmetic cover-up to make their condition less obvious. This can help increase your comfort level in some social situations and may require less energy in terms of handling the curious glances from strangers. Nevertheless, cosmetic cover-ups are not appropriate for everyone at every time. Never use cosmetics on open psoriasis lesions or on irritated skin. As well, the use of cosmetic cover-ups is not recommended for certain types of psoriasis (such as those associated with widespread areas of redness) because the skin is already inflamed and stinging or redness may result. If you have concerns about using cosmetic cover-ups, talk to your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Before you apply cosmetics, try to gently remove as much scaling as possible. Talk to your doctor about the best methods to do this. And remember that you can use creative clothing options to cover your psoriasis too. In warm weather, you may wish to wear a sunhat or lightweight cotton shirts with long sleeves, or in the winter, experiment with turtlenecks or layering lightweight long-sleeved clothing (to accommodate differing temperatures indoors and out).

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/Psoriasis-FAQ